Exercise Fakeouts

MS HCI/d | I541 Project

2023

Team

Sriram Hemanth Kumar

Tanya Bansal

Shantanu Thorat

Tanmayee Pemmaraju

Duration

3 weeks

Prompt

Create or modify an existing activity tracker application that links to a wearable device, empowering users to be healthier. We have to do this by describing and systematically altering the user's mental model about what activities are beneficial, rewarding these behaviors rather than common "cheats" to the system.

Design Process

Week 1

Secondary research

Investigation

Investigation

Week 1 - 2

Primary Research

Interview

Interview

Week 2

Data Analysis

Affinity Diagramming

Affinity Diagramming

Week 2 - 3

Prototyping

Sketches & Wireframes

Sketches & Wireframes

Week 3

Evaluation

Usability Testing

Usability Testing

Secondary Research

Selecting target audience based on age group

The devices are popular with Gen Zers (70%), millennials (57%) and women (51%).

Nearly 70% of Americans Would Wear a Fitness Tracker/Smartwatch for Discounted Health Insurance.

Why Twenties

This age group strikes the perfect balance between tech adaptability, health consciousness and social engagement. Their openness to new technologies, combined with the pressure of social validation, makes them the ideal audience for innovative fitness trackers.

Insights from secondary research

The quality of the exercise is immensely more important than the quantity of work done when exercising.

Steps alone, do not provide information about exercise intensity, which may be more important than the number of steps taken.

External motivation or accountability plays a significant role in the user's improvement in the activity.

Primary Research

Takeaways from the interview

Exaggerates the number of steps or activities in conversations with others.

Walking is the main form of exercise or activity, indicating a preference for low-impact, steady-state cardio.

While there might be moments of trying to trick the system or take shortcuts, the primary instinct is to push harder and genuinely achieve the goal.

Has set a goal of 10,000 steps without a clear understanding of its significance.

Data Analysis

Insights compiled from secondary and primary research.

Affinity Diagramming

The Problem Identified

Users are primarily motivated by achieving a preset step goal or a self-imposed target, leading to feelings of dissatisfaction, exaggeration, and instances of dishonest activity reporting. How might we shift user motivation away from rigid step goals, while still encouraging physical activity and wellness?

Solution

Abstract Visuals

Using visual graphics to represent a user's activities, including walking, standing and running. These graphics also indicate the intensity of their activity.

Personalized Messages

Secondly we use personalized messages designed to inspire users to either walk faster or maintain their physical activity.

Storyboard

Sketches by Shantanu Thorat.

Wireframes

Wireframes by Tanya Bansal.

Usability Testing

Feedback

The motivational messages need to be more natural & suggestive in a way that is not irritating over time.

Need more clarity and understanding of their activity.

The app should educate users about why an activity is beneficial.

Final Design

Wireframes by Tanya Bansal.

References

  1. Washington Post. (2021, December 21). Fitness activity tracker obsession can be unhealthy. Retrieved September 11, 2023. www.washingtonpost.com/wellness/2021/12/21/fitness-activity-tracker-obsession-unhealthy/


  2. Alqhatani, M., & Hassanein, K. (2019). “There is nothing that I need to keep secret”: Sharing Practices and Concerns of Wearable Fitness Data. Proceedings of the Fifteenth Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security. https://www.usenix.org/system/files/soups2019-alqhatani.pdf


  3. Garage Gym Reviews. (n.d.). Workout gamification. https://www.garagegymreviews.com/workout-gamification

  4. TestDevLab. (2022, January 19). Testing fitness apps: Can you cheat the algorithm? https://www.testdevlab.com/blog/testing-fitness-apps-can-you-cheat-the-algorithm

  5. Go Get Fit. (2022, March 8). The negative side effects of fitness trackers. https://www.goget.fit/pa-blog/the-negative-side-effects-of-fitness-trackers-jxd2r-523mf

Exercise Fakeouts

MS HCI/d | I541 Project

2023

Team

Sriram Hemanth Kumar

Tanya Bansal

Shantanu Thorat

Tanmayee Pemmaraju

Duration

3 weeks

Prompt

Create or modify an existing activity tracker application that links to a wearable device, empowering users to be healthier. We have to do this by describing and systematically altering the user's mental model about what activities are beneficial, rewarding these behaviors rather than common "cheats" to the system.

Design Process

Week 1

Secondary research

Investigation

Investigation

Week 1 - 2

Primary Research

Interview

Interview

Week 2

Data Analysis

Affinity Diagramming

Affinity Diagramming

Week 2 - 3

Prototyping

Sketches & Wireframes

Sketches & Wireframes

Week 3

Evaluation

Usability Testing

Usability Testing

Secondary Research

Selecting target audience based on age group

The devices are popular with Gen Zers (70%), millennials (57%) and women (51%).

Nearly 70% of Americans Would Wear a Fitness Tracker/Smartwatch for Discounted Health Insurance.

Why Twenties

This age group strikes the perfect balance between tech adaptability, health consciousness and social engagement. Their openness to new technologies, combined with the pressure of social validation, makes them the ideal audience for innovative fitness trackers.

Insights from secondary research

The quality of the exercise is immensely more important than the quantity of work done when exercising.

Steps alone, do not provide information about exercise intensity, which may be more important than the number of steps taken.

External motivation or accountability plays a significant role in the user's improvement in the activity.

Primary Research

Takeaways from the interview

Exaggerates the number of steps or activities in conversations with others.

Walking is the main form of exercise or activity, indicating a preference for low-impact, steady-state cardio.

While there might be moments of trying to trick the system or take shortcuts, the primary instinct is to push harder and genuinely achieve the goal.

Has set a goal of 10,000 steps without a clear understanding of its significance.

Data Analysis

Insights compiled from secondary and primary research.

Affinity Diagramming

The Problem Identified

Users are primarily motivated by achieving a preset step goal or a self-imposed target, leading to feelings of dissatisfaction, exaggeration, and instances of dishonest activity reporting. How might we shift user motivation away from rigid step goals, while still encouraging physical activity and wellness?

Solution

Abstract Visuals

Using visual graphics to represent a user's activities, including walking, standing and running. These graphics also indicate the intensity of their activity.

Personalized Messages

Secondly we use personalized messages designed to inspire users to either walk faster or maintain their physical activity.

Storyboard

Sketches by Shantanu Thorat.

Wireframes

Wireframes by Tanya Bansal.

Usability Testing

Feedback

The motivational messages need to be more natural & suggestive in a way that is not irritating over time.

Need more clarity and understanding of their activity.

The app should educate users about why an activity is beneficial.

Final Design

Wireframes by Tanya Bansal.

References

  1. Washington Post. (2021, December 21). Fitness activity tracker obsession can be unhealthy. Retrieved September 11, 2023. www.washingtonpost.com/wellness/2021/12/21/fitness-activity-tracker-obsession-unhealthy/


  2. Alqhatani, M., & Hassanein, K. (2019). “There is nothing that I need to keep secret”: Sharing Practices and Concerns of Wearable Fitness Data. Proceedings of the Fifteenth Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security. https://www.usenix.org/system/files/soups2019-alqhatani.pdf


  3. Garage Gym Reviews. (n.d.). Workout gamification. https://www.garagegymreviews.com/workout-gamification

  4. TestDevLab. (2022, January 19). Testing fitness apps: Can you cheat the algorithm? https://www.testdevlab.com/blog/testing-fitness-apps-can-you-cheat-the-algorithm

  5. Go Get Fit. (2022, March 8). The negative side effects of fitness trackers. https://www.goget.fit/pa-blog/the-negative-side-effects-of-fitness-trackers-jxd2r-523mf

Exercise Fakeouts

MS HCI/d | I541 Project

2023

Team

Sriram Hemanth Kumar

Tanya Bansal

Shantanu Thorat

Tanmayee Pemmaraju

Duration

3 weeks

Prompt

Create or modify an existing activity tracker application that links to a wearable device, empowering users to be healthier. We have to do this by describing and systematically altering the user's mental model about what activities are beneficial, rewarding these behaviors rather than common "cheats" to the system.

Design Process

Week 1

Secondary research

Investigation

Investigation

Week 1 - 2

Primary Research

Interview

Interview

Week 2

Data Analysis

Affinity Diagramming

Affinity Diagramming

Week 2 - 3

Prototyping

Sketches & Wireframes

Sketches & Wireframes

Week 3

Evaluation

Usability Testing

Usability Testing

Secondary Research

Selecting target audience based on age group

The devices are popular with Gen Zers (70%), millennials (57%) and women (51%).

Nearly 70% of Americans Would Wear a Fitness Tracker/Smartwatch for Discounted Health Insurance.

Why Twenties

This age group strikes the perfect balance between tech adaptability, health consciousness and social engagement. Their openness to new technologies, combined with the pressure of social validation, makes them the ideal audience for innovative fitness trackers.

Insights from secondary research

The quality of the exercise is immensely more important than the quantity of work done when exercising.

Steps alone, do not provide information about exercise intensity, which may be more important than the number of steps taken.

External motivation or accountability plays a significant role in the user's improvement in the activity.

Primary Research

Takeaways from the interview

Exaggerates the number of steps or activities in conversations with others.

Walking is the main form of exercise or activity, indicating a preference for low-impact, steady-state cardio.

While there might be moments of trying to trick the system or take shortcuts, the primary instinct is to push harder and genuinely achieve the goal.

Has set a goal of 10,000 steps without a clear understanding of its significance.

Data Analysis

Insights compiled from secondary and primary research.

Affinity Diagramming

The Problem Identified

Users are primarily motivated by achieving a preset step goal or a self-imposed target, leading to feelings of dissatisfaction, exaggeration, and instances of dishonest activity reporting. How might we shift user motivation away from rigid step goals, while still encouraging physical activity and wellness?

Solution

Abstract Visuals

Using visual graphics to represent a user's activities, including walking, standing and running. These graphics also indicate the intensity of their activity.

Personalized Messages

Secondly we use personalized messages designed to inspire users to either walk faster or maintain their physical activity.

Storyboard

Sketches by Shantanu Thorat.

Wireframes

Wireframes by Tanya Bansal.

Usability Testing

Feedback

The motivational messages need to be more natural & suggestive in a way that is not irritating over time.

Need more clarity and understanding of their activity.

The app should educate users about why an activity is beneficial.

Final Design

Wireframes by Tanya Bansal.

References

  1. Washington Post. (2021, December 21). Fitness activity tracker obsession can be unhealthy. Retrieved September 11, 2023. www.washingtonpost.com/wellness/2021/12/21/fitness-activity-tracker-obsession-unhealthy/


  2. Alqhatani, M., & Hassanein, K. (2019). “There is nothing that I need to keep secret”: Sharing Practices and Concerns of Wearable Fitness Data. Proceedings of the Fifteenth Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security. https://www.usenix.org/system/files/soups2019-alqhatani.pdf


  3. Garage Gym Reviews. (n.d.). Workout gamification. https://www.garagegymreviews.com/workout-gamification

  4. TestDevLab. (2022, January 19). Testing fitness apps: Can you cheat the algorithm? https://www.testdevlab.com/blog/testing-fitness-apps-can-you-cheat-the-algorithm

  5. Go Get Fit. (2022, March 8). The negative side effects of fitness trackers. https://www.goget.fit/pa-blog/the-negative-side-effects-of-fitness-trackers-jxd2r-523mf

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